Politics of Spatial Imagination in the Dutch Colonial Myth

Originally posted on Processed Life:

“The modern world hates to see black folks resting.” — Lewis Gordon, “African American Philosophy, Race, and the Geography of Reason.”

In the 19th century, the opponents of penal colonialism thought it inadvisable to deport prisoners to hard labour. In an official document to the then King, they write (my translations),

“The examination of the hereby dated report of the Minister of Justice and the associated lists of prisoners who are considered to be suitable for transportation to Brazil, or any of the other overseas possessions, has convinced me that the persons referred to cannot be made use of for the benefit of your Majesty’s colonies.

In the West, experience has shown us that, in a hot climate, only Negroes should be used for the cultivation of the land as well as other physical labour; under no circumstances should Europeans be put to work, and women, who…

View original 3,864 more words

“thebeautifulonesarehere” (with thanks to Lebo Ntladi)

Originally posted on Gukira:

1. Openings

A stare—let us not call it a gaze—is solicited. Staring is persistent attention, bafflement, return. Again and again, “what is this?” and “how is it calling to me?” and “why is it calling to me?”

The siren song of visual objects.

I encountered Lebo Ntladi’s “thebeautifulonesarehere,” one of four in a series, at the Critically Queer exhibition curated by Jabu Pereira at the University of Cape Town. “Encounter” does not quite capture the multiple times I returned to look at the photograph, captured, first, by the recognizability of a human form, face-to-chest, and then by its dispersal into space, its accumulation of known and unknown cityscapes and landscapes, its vibrant colors and geometries, its making and unmaking of gendered (and other) possibilities.

Captured, I begged Lebo to send me photos of the work so I could try “thinking with it.” Lebo graciously agreed, sending me digital files of…

View original 1,973 more words

Consider the possibility

Originally posted on An und für sich:

Is this Left Forum panel a US propaganda psyop? I want to ask my comrades on the left to consider the possibility. After years of research, I have determined that conspiracy-based thinking is just the kind of obscurantism that thrives on the political right. The panelists seem determined to make a mockery of the left by going beyond the proverbial “circular firing squad” and accusing those they disagree with of being active collaborators with the enemy — effectively staging a Stalinist show trial that will confirm the worst suspicions of the persuadable mainstream. I’ll trace the origins of the Zizek Conspiracy Theory Industry to unhinged pseudonymous bloggers who now only talk to each other, having been blocked by all reasonable people. It is they who laid the groundwork for putting forth the model of 9/11 Truthers and Birthers as the pinnacle of hip “lefty” and “radical” thought.

View original

nicole gombay on poaching and settler colonialism

Originally posted on settler colonial studies blog:

Nicole Gombay, ‘”Poaching” – What’s in a name? Debates about law, property, and protection in the context of settler colonialism’, Geoforum 55 (August 2014).

Framed within debates about political ontology, this paper explores how, in a settler colonial context, state-governed wildlife management reflects a complex set of assumptions and power relations that structure understandings and enactments of law, property, and notions of protection. Drawing upon the statements of Inuit research participants, the paper examines the definition of ‘poaching’, and underscores the conceptually controversial assumptions underlying this word. The paper demonstrates how the term represents a culturally and historically specific set of beliefs and practices by the state that are unintelligible from an Inuit frame of reference, because the ontological, epistemological, and teleological assumptions upon which they rest are fundamentally incommensurable with their own. Critiques of political ecology and political economy claim that such forms of analysis have naturalized the…

View original 91 more words

Exhibit W(oman)

Originally posted on /kaw·reɪdʒ/:

There are many unbelievably graphic images of little girls undergoing FGM – images that are used by organisations and campaigns that purportedly oppose the practice.

Likewise, there are many graphic images of survivors of acid attacks. There are many images of bruised and battered women on display. Images of bloodied women’s bodies.

All this is done under the guise of “showing” and “exposing” the truth. Their names are published, without concern for their consent or privacy. Their faces are shown with little to no regard for their security.

The purpose of such imagery is not to portray the extent of violent enacted on women, but rather to portray the extent of “their” violence against “their” women.

And so when I inevitably encounter these images, I’m left both appalled and angered at this dual dehumanisation of off-colour women: dehumanised to become recipients of violence, and dehumanised to become mere objects to exhibit.

View original

The problems of peer review

Originally posted on Society and Space - Environment and Planning D:

Another good posting on the ups and downs of peer review from the group blog, New APPS: Art, Politics, Philosophy, Science.  It’s a good prompt for us to remind readers about the process of peer review at Society and Space and, while recognizing the extraordinary demands made on scholars today, to consider the importance of peer review for maintaining the excellent quality of our authors’ papers.

At Society and Space, every initial submission is typically read by all four of the editors as part of a prescreening process.  We consider the paper’s fit with the broad aims of the journal, quality of the paper, its theoretical sophistication (i.e., the suitability of the approach for our readership), its empirical rigor, the appropriateness of length and style, and whether a redirection to another journal is a better route than peer review with us, given the answers to these considerations. …

View original 491 more words

The Queer Caribbean: Conflicting Uses of the Colonial Past

Originally posted on NOTCHES:

By Agnes Arnold-Forster 

In 1991, the Progressive Liberal Party government amended the Bahamas’ Sexual Offences Act, decriminalising “buggery” and other same-sex sexual acts in private. Over twenty years later the Bahamas still remains ahead of the majority of its Caribbean neighbours. Male-male sexual activity continues to be illegal in eleven Caribbean nations. Female-female sexual activity is illegal in seven. The Caribbean region also has some of the world’s most severe punitive laws relating to homosexuality. And it is no coincidence that, after sub-Saharan Africa, it has the second highest rate of HIV-prevalence. 32.9% of Jamaican men who have sex with men are HIV positive – the world’s highest prevalence rate among this particularly vulnerable population. Anti-gay laws have institutionalised a toxic homophobic environment that prevents LGBTQ persons from seeking the prevention and care they are entitled to.

Anti-discrimination movements and efforts to dismantle punitive legislation are gaining a fragile…

View original 605 more words

The Queer Caribbean: Conflicting Uses of the Colonial Past

Originally posted on NOTCHES:

By Agnes Arnold-Forster 

In 1991, the Progressive Liberal Party government amended the Bahamas’ Sexual Offences Act, decriminalising “buggery” and other same-sex sexual acts in private. Over twenty years later the Bahamas still remains ahead of the majority of its Caribbean neighbours. Male-male sexual activity continues to be illegal in eleven Caribbean nations. Female-female sexual activity is illegal in seven. The Caribbean region also has some of the world’s most severe punitive laws relating to homosexuality. And it is no coincidence that, after sub-Saharan Africa, it has the second highest rate of HIV-prevalence. 32.9% of Jamaican men who have sex with men are HIV positive – the world’s highest prevalence rate among this particularly vulnerable population. Anti-gay laws have institutionalised a toxic homophobic environment that prevents LGBTQ persons from seeking the prevention and care they are entitled to.

Anti-discrimination movements and efforts to dismantle punitive legislation are gaining a fragile…

View original 605 more words

Sounding Out! Podcast #29: Game Audio Notes I: Growing Sounds for Sim Cell

Oren Stark:

Very interesting possibilities… made me wonder how using the genetic algorithm in digital music would play out. In particular, it made me think of Manuel DeLanda’s discussion of Deleuze, morphogenesis and working with materials in art: http://youtu.be/50-d_J0hKz0

Originally posted on Sounding Out!:

Sound and Pleasure2A pair of firsts! This is both the lead post in our summer Sound and Pleasureseries, and the first podcast in a three part series by Leonard J. Paul. What is the connection between sound and enjoyment, and how are pleasing sounds designed? Pleasure is, after all, what brings y’all back to Sounding Out! weekly, is it not?

In today’s installment Leonard peels back the curtain of game audio design and reveals his creative process. For anyone curious as to what creative decisions lead to the bloops, bleeps, and ambient soundscapes of video games, this is essential listening. Stay tuned for next Monday’s installment on the process of designing sound for Retro City Rampage, and next month’s episode which focuses on the game Vessel. Today, Leonard begins by picking apart his design process at a cellular level. Literally! -AT, Multimedia Editor

-

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOADGame Audio Notes I:…

View original 1,420 more words

Ways Of Seeing

Originally posted on Bring Me The African Guy:

I am thinking about what horror movies teach us about blind spots, getting blindsided, backdoor looking, around-the-corner looking, about the receding contours of blurry figures at the edge of sight. And perhaps I am simply grappling with Povinelli’s notion of the difficulty of “seeing what is [in] front of our eyes but outside our field of vision.”

View original