Foucault Studies 18 now published – includes two translations of Foucault, all open access

Originally posted on Progressive Geographies:

cover_issue_568_en_US (1)Foucault Studies 18 is now published. A wide range of contents including a theme section on ‘Ethnographies of Neoliberal Governmentalities'; translations of Foucault’s 1979 version of ‘Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century‘ and his review of Jacques Ruffié, De la biologie à la culture under the title of ‘Bio‐history and bio‐politics‘; and a review forum on Colin Koopman’s Genealogy as Critique. As ever, all articles are open access.

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TWN Releases Haitian Documentary Film DEPORTED

Originally posted on Repeating Islands:

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“DEPORTED takes an unflinching look at the plight of Haitian deportees trying to desperately integrate in a foreign society that is less than welcoming.”

Alexandra Phanor-Faury, Ebony Magazine

“Since the immigration debate almost never takes up issues affecting blacks, DEPORTED offered us a rare, important opportunity to sound the alarm on and inspire dialogue concerning crucial issues impacting many immigrants and their families.”

Leslie Fields-Cruz, Black Public Media

Third World Newsreel is proud to announce the educational release of Rachèle Magloire & Chantal Regnault’s DEPORTED, a new documentary film about members of a unique group of outcasts in Haiti: criminal deportees from North America.

Through the portraits and interviews of four deportees in Haiti and their families in North America, DEPORTED presents the tragedy of broken lives, forced separation from American children and spouses, and alienation and stigmatization endured in a country they don’t know and don’t understand, a country…

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Whither Justice?

Originally posted on Gukira:

On Saturday, September 20, Mr. Tony Mochama, a columnist with Kenya’s Standard Group, Secretary of PEN Kenya, and holder of a Morland Writing Scholarship, sexually assaulted a woman during a gathering of Kenyan and international poets. Mr. Mochama is a well-known figure in Kenya’s literary circles: he has hosted open mics, promotes literary culture in his work for PEN Kenya, and travels abroad regularly as an ambassador for Kenyan literature. Beyond his own accomplishments and labor, Mr. Mochama represents us. An us that encompasses all Kenyan literary workers, cultural producers, and cultural administrators. Quite simply: he is one of Kenya’s faces.

What are we to do when one of our collective faces commits sexual assault? How do we face that aspect of ourselves?

Kenyan philosopher John Mbiti argued that the African sense of self could be found in the formulation, “I am because we are.” Extrapolating from…

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Staring Into the Abyss

Originally posted on synthetic_zero:

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Radiolab HOST Brooke Gladstone follows up on her conversation with Jad Abumrad and Eugene Thacker to explore our longstanding fascination with nihilism: why it’s popular today, and whether that’s always been the case..

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/staring-abyss/

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michael titlestad on the south african apocalypse

Originally posted on settler colonial studies blog:

Michael Titlestad, ‘South African end times: Conceiving an apolcalyptic imaginary’, Tydskrif vir Letterkunde 51, 2 (2014).

The future of South Africa has most commonly been conceived as a prospective apocalyptic upheaval in which the nation fractures along race lines. This expectation preceded, but informed the rise of apartheid, and has accompanied its demise. This article argues that catastrophic prediction—the trope of a looming racial Armageddon—is like a worn coin: familiar currency so often spent. Nonetheless, we need to conceive how this particular political theology settled into our polity; why it has proved so adaptable (through and despite the “miraculous” transformation of 1994); and, how its tenacity—which is politically anodyne at best and fascist at worst—might be challenged. The article conceives of a study (comprising nine essays) which sets out to analyze aspects of this history of fear, without simply taking its existence and persistence for granted. Keywords: South African apocalypse…

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“hands up, don’t shoot”

Originally posted on Gukira:

We all know that hands raised in the air at a moment of conflict indicate surrender. They say, “I’m unarmed” or “I’ve laid down my arms” and “please, do not harm me” and “I am in your power.” At least, those of us who watch tv and films, read cartoons and novels, track newspapers and magazines. This “I surrender” sign is a global vernacular, taught and circulated by children’s cartoons. (We might need to ask why children’s cartoons teach this vernacular.) And so, what is striking about “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” as a chanted slogan and as printed words on handmade, often homemade, signs is that it indexes the failure of this bodily vernacular when performed by a black body, by a killable body. Blackness becomes the break in this global bodily vernacular, the error that makes this bodily action illegible, the disposability that renders the gesture irrelevant.

Blackness, after…

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michael morden on non-indigenous mobilisation in canada and settler colonialism

Originally posted on settler colonial studies blog:

Michael Morden, ‘Across the Barricades: Non-Indigenous Mobilization and Settler Colonialism in Canada’, Canadian Political Science Review 8, 1 (2014).

Recently, a new body of scholarship on “settler colonialism” has emerged with the goal to analyze the non-Native dimension of Indigenous-settler relations, in Canada and other settler states. This paper will identify two shortcomings of the new literature: first, a tendency to conflate mass-level non-Natives with the state itself; and second, an erroneous, primordial presentation of non-Native norms and identity. The paper examines two case studies of settler political mobilization in opposition to Indigenous peoples, in the contexts of the Indigenous occupations at Ipperwash/Aazhoodena in the early- to mid-1990s, and Caledonia/Kanonhstaton in 2006. The cases reveal consistency in how the mobilization is framed by non-Native participants – as a defense of abstract procedural principles like equality before the law and public order. This normative framework does not resonate with settler colonial…

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